NIH-Funding

NIH Applicant Assistance Program (AAP) for New or Previously Unawarded Small Businesses

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 10:07
Notice NOT-CA-18-031 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Categories: NIH-Funding

The Importance of Timely Grant Closeout

Rock Talk: NIH Extramural News - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 09:19

At any given time, NIH staff are monitoring nearly 50,000 active grant awards. This monitoring happens throughout the grant life cycle, including once the award is over. Just as we strive to award meritorious grants as quickly as we can, it is equally important for us to ensure grant awards are taken off the books in a timely manner.  A grant that slips past its closeout due date is costly and time consuming.

NIH has for years highlighted the impact of discrepancies between final financial reports for grant closeout and the importance of timely closeout. Ideally, we engage in a bilateral closeout with our awardees at the end of an award as described in Section 8.6 of the NIH Grants Policy Statement. This means that the awardee submits acceptable final research progress reports, expenditure reports, cash transaction reports, and invention reports within the required timeframe.

Most NIH grants are closed in a timely manner as required. But, unfortunately, too many grants have payment accounts that remain open beyond the time required for closeout. For each of these grants, we, and by proxy the taxpayer, pays a fee to keep the accounts in the Payment Management System open. This is money better directed elsewhere. We have taken steps to remedy the situation.

NIH recently issued NIH Guide notice (NOT-OD-18-107) alerting the community that we are now strengthening enforcement of the longstanding closeout requirements. The notice informs the community that, in accordance with the Grants Oversight and New Efficiency (GONE) Act and HHS policy, NIH will initiate unilateral closeout—i.e. closeout without receipt of acceptable final reports—for all awards that fail to meet closeout requirements within 120 calendar days.

We can see that this initiative is paying off—as NIH unilaterally closed a backlog of over 5,000 grant payment accounts over the last year.

Occasionally, awardees may have questions on the closeout process or need more time to get their affairs in order. We understand that. In cases seeking an extension past the 120 days, awardees may submit a request for more time from the funding NIH Institute or Center.

Failing to meet the standard closeout requirements may adversely affect future funding decisions. Failure to correct recurring reporting problems may cause NIH to take one or more actions that may include, but are not limited to, corrective actions, withholding of further awards, suspension or termination.

We seek your continued support in managing this important grant function, as scientific and financial monitoring are key components of our role as responsible stewards of taxpayer funds.

Categories: NIH-Funding

Improving Implementation of Seek, Test, Treat and Retain Strategies among People Who Inject Drugs in Low to Middle Income Countries (R01-Clinical Trial Required)

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 04:51
Funding Opportunity RFA-DA-18-017 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This FOA supports developing and testing implementation approaches that scale-up evidence based interventions in low to middle income countries among PWID where they form an important component of the national HIV epidemic, including countries where PWID are a relatively emergent population for HIV cases. Projects need to align with national HIV/AIDS plans and provide models for large scale implementation, including QA/QC systems. Collaboration with local or regional PEPFAR and Global Fund programs is encouraged. Recently introduced syringe services and drug treatment settings should be leveraged as well as new health financing systems, criminal justice reforms or other local innovations that can be used to expand HIV prevention and treatment for PWID. Collaboration with NIH initiatives such as IeDEA (NIHs cohort of cohorts co-funded by NIDA) and existing NIDA-funded projects is encouraged.
Categories: NIH-Funding

NIDCR Clinical Trial Planning and Implementation Cooperative Agreement (UG3/UH3) - Clinical Trial Required

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 04:30
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-547 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to solicit UG3/UH3 phased cooperative agreement research applications to plan and implement clinical trials. Awards made under this FOA will initially support a one-year milestone-driven planning phase (UG3), with possible transition to a clinical trial implementation phase of up to five years (UH3). Only UG3 projects that have met the scientific milestones and feasibility requirements may transition to the UH3 phase. The UG3/UH3 application must be submitted as a single application, following the instructions described in this FOA. The UG3 phase will permit the Principal Investigator to finalize the study team and will support activities to develop: the final clinical protocol; the Clinical Investigators Brochure (or equivalent), if needed; the data management system and other tools for data collection and quality management, safety and operational oversight plans; recruitment and retention strategies; and other essential documents such as the Manual of Procedures for the subsequent clinical trial in the UH3 phase. The UG3 planning phase is not designed for the collection of preliminary data on the efficacy of the intervention (such as pre-clinical studies with animals), or the collection of observational data from humans to support the rationale for a clinical trial. Evaluation of the potential subject population to determine individuals eligibility for participation in the future UH3 trial is allowed in the UG3 phase but not required. The UH3 phase of the award will support the conduct of one investigator-initiated clinical trial intended to assess safety and/or efficacy of various types of interventions.
Categories: NIH-Funding

FINDINGS OF RESEARCH MISCONDUCT

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 04:17
Notice NOT-OD-18-121 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Categories: NIH-Funding

Basic and Translation Research on Decision Making in Aging and Alzheimer's Disease (R21 - Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 04:07
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-538 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) invites applications for basic research to better characterize the affective, cognitive, social, and motivational parameters of impaired and intact decision making in both normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research is sought that will characterize the extent to which basic behavioral and neural processes involved in decision-making are differentially impacted in normal aging and AD, investigate the influence of social factors on decision-making, and investigate the decision-making factors that render older adults (with or without cognitive impairment) vulnerable to financial exploitation and other forms of mistreatment and abuse. The FOA also invites applications to apply basic research on the processes involved in decision-making to the design of decision-supportive interventions for midlife and older adults with and without AD. Specific opportunities include the development of decision supportive interventions to leverage cognitive, emotional and motivational strengths of these populations: tools to assess decisional capacity; strategies for simplifying choices and offering better defaults; and the promotion of timely adoption of optimal delegation practices (e.g., power of attorney, living wills, etc.).
Categories: NIH-Funding

Basic and Translational Research on Decision Making in Aging and Alzheimer's Disease (R01 - Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 04:07
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-544 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) invites applications for basic research to better characterize the affective, cognitive, social, and motivational parameters of impaired and intact decision making in both normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research is sought that will characterize the extent to which basic behavioral and neural processes involved in decision-making are differentially impacted in normal aging and AD, investigate the influence of social factors on decision-making, and investigate the decision-making factors that render older adults (with or without cognitive impairment) vulnerable to financial exploitation and other forms of mistreatment and abuse. The FOA also invites applications to apply basic research on the processes involved in decision-making to the design of decision-supportive interventions for midlife and older adults with and without AD. Specific opportunities include the development of decision-supportive interventions to leverage cognitive, emotional and motivational strengths of these populations: tools to assess decisional capacity; strategies for simplifying choices and offering better defaults; and the promotion of timely adoption of optimal delegation practices (e.g., power of attorney, living wells, etc.).
Categories: NIH-Funding

Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN): Small Molecule Drug Discovery and Development for Disorders of the Nervous System (U44) - Clinical Trial Optional

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 03:52
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-541 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN) encourages applications from small businesses seeking support to advance their small molecule drug discovery and development projects into the clinic. Participants in the BPN are responsible for conducting all studies that involve disease- or target-specific assays, models, and other research tools and receive funding for all activities to be conducted in their own laboratories. In addition, applicants will collaborate with NIH-funded consultants and can augment their project with NIH contract research organizations (CROs) that specialize in medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, formulations development, chemical synthesis including under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and Phase I clinical testing. Projects can enter either at the Discovery stage, to optimize promising hit compounds through medicinal chemistry, or at the Development stage, to advance a development candidate through Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling toxicology studies and phase I clinical testing. Projects that enter at the Discovery stage and meet their milestones may continue on through Development. BPN awardee institutions retain their assignment of IP rights and gain assignment of IP rights from the BPN contractors (and thereby control the patent prosecution and licensing negotiations) for drug candidates developed in this program.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN): Small Molecule Drug Discovery and Development of Disorders of the Nervous System (UG3/UH3) - Clinical Trial Optional

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 03:52
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-546 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN) invites applications from neuroscience investigators seeking support to advance their small molecule drug discovery and development projects into the clinic. Participants in the BPN are responsible for conducting all studies that involve disease- or target-specific assays, models, and other research tools and receive funding for all activities to be conducted in their own laboratories. In addition, applicants will collaborate with NIH-funded consultants and can augment their project with NIH contract research organizations (CROs) that specialize in medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, formulations development, chemical synthesis including under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and Phase I clinical testing. Projects can enter either at the Discovery stage, to optimize promising hit compounds through medicinal chemistry, or at the Development stage, to advance a development candidate through Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling toxicology studies and phase I clinical testing. Projects that enter at the Discovery stage and meet their milestones may continue on through Development. BPN awardee Institutions retain their assignment of IP rights and gain assignment of IP rights from the BPN contractors (and thereby control the patent prosecution and licensing negotiations) for drug candidates developed in this program.
Categories: NIH-Funding

International Research Scientist Development Award (IRSDA) (K01) - Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 02:14
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-539 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of the International Research Scientist Development Award (IRSDA) is to provide support and protected time (three to five years) to advanced postdoctoral U.S. research scientists and recently-appointed U.S. junior faculty (applicants must be at least two years beyond conferral of doctoral degree) for an intensive, mentored research career development experience in a low- or middle-income country (LMIC), as defined by the World Bank (http://data.worldbank.org/about/country-classifications/country-and-lending-groups, including low-income, lower-middle-income, and upper-middle-income countries) leading to an independently-funded research career focused on global health. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications from early-career investigators from any health-related discipline who propose career development activities and a research project that is relevant to the health priorities of the LMIC under the mentorship of LMIC and U.S. mentors. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is designed specifically for applicants proposing to serve as the lead investigator of an independent clinical trial, a clinical trial feasibility study, or a separate ancillary study to an existing trial, as part of their research and career development. Applicants not planning an independent clinical trial, or proposing to gain research experience in a clinical trial led by another investigator, must apply to companion FOA (PAR-18-MMM).
Categories: NIH-Funding

International Research Scientist Development Award (IRSDA) (K01) - Independent Clinical Trial Required

NIH Funding Announcements - Thu, 12/21/2017 - 02:14
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-540 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of the International Research Scientist Development Award (IRSDA) is to provide support and protected time (three to five years) to advanced postdoctoral U.S. research scientists and recently-appointed U.S. junior faculty (applicants must be at least two years beyond conferral of doctoral degree) for an intensive, mentored research career development experience in a low- or middle-income country (LMIC), as defined by the World Bank (http://data.worldbank.org/about/country-classifications/country-and-lending-groups, including low-income, lower-middle-income, and upper-middle-income countries) leading to an independently-funded research career focused on global health. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications from early-career investigators from any health-related discipline who propose career development activities and a research project that is relevant to the health priorities of the LMIC under the mentorship of LMIC and U.S. mentors. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is designed specifically for applicants proposing to serve as the lead investigator of an independent clinical trial, a clinical trial feasibility study, or a separate ancillary study to an existing trial, as part of their research and career development. Applicants not planning an independent clinical trial, or proposing to gain research experience in a clinical trial led by another investigator, must apply to companion FOA (PAR-18-MMM).
Categories: NIH-Funding

By: writedit

WriteEdit-Grant Questions Blog - Wed, 12/20/2017 - 18:15

Thanks for sharing your intel with us. Again, congratulations, and best wishes for success with your research!

Categories: NIH-Funding

By: YJ

WriteEdit-Grant Questions Blog - Wed, 12/20/2017 - 17:46

Thanks, Mine was 6th percentile. Per my recent discussion with the PO, current payline is 7the percentile for R21.

Categories: NIH-Funding

By: R21_Hopeful

WriteEdit-Grant Questions Blog - Wed, 12/20/2017 - 17:37

Congratulations @YJ. Were you at 7th percentile or better for an R21?

Categories: NIH-Funding

By: writedit

WriteEdit-Grant Questions Blog - Wed, 12/20/2017 - 17:11

Congratulations – you should get some of that cut back (maybe all, depending on whether it was all due to CR) once the budget passes.

Categories: NIH-Funding