NIH-Funding

Linking the Provider Recommendation to Adolescent HPV Vaccine Uptake (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 09:39
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-019 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research on how the healthcare delivery system enhances or inhibits the effectiveness of a provider's recommendation of the adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Characteristics of the provider, parent/patient, and clinical setting, can all affect whether a provider makes a recommendation, and whether that recommendation results in uptake of the HPV vaccine. This research requires expertise in cancer prevention, adult and childhood behavior, immunization promotion, and healthcare delivery
Categories: NIH-Funding

Linking the Provider Recommendation to Adolescent HPV Vaccine Uptake (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 09:36
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-008 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research on how the healthcare delivery system enhances or inhibits the effectiveness of a provider's recommendation of the adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Characteristics of the provider, parent/patient, and clinical setting, can all affect whether a provider makes a recommendation, and whether that recommendation results in uptake of the HPV vaccine. This research requires expertise in cancer prevention, adult and childhood behavior, immunization promotion, and healthcare delivery.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Continuing Steps to Ensuring Credibility of NIH Research: Selecting Journals with Credible Practices

Rock Talk: NIH Extramural News - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 08:54

The scientific community is paying increasing attention to the quality practices of journals and publishers. NIH recently released a Guide notice (NOT-OD-18-011) to encourage authors to publish in journals that do not undermine the credibility, impact, and accuracy of their research findings. This notice aims to raise awareness about practices like changing publication fees without notice, lacking transparency in publication procedures, misrepresenting editorial boards, and/or using suspicious peer review.

This may not be a big problem for NIH-funded publications now; our colleagues Jennifer Marill, Kathryn Funk, and Jerry Sheehan from the National Library of Medicine note that more than 90% of the 815,000 publicly available journal articles reporting on NIH-funded research are published in MEDLINE indexed journals. Nonetheless, we do know that a problem exists – there are articles reporting NIH-funded research appearing in journals that engage in questionable practices. Ensuring the credibility of NIH funded research is important to maintaining public trust in research.

NIH has taken—and continues to take—many steps to ensure the credibility of the research it supports. From enhancing rigor and reproducibility, to encouraging sharing of data and protocols, to promoting pre-prints, and to requiring timely registration and reporting of clinical trial results, NIH establishes policies to make our funded research as credible, transparent, rigorous, and full of impact as possible.

But what can we do?

Simply put, publish where you cite. If you are not familiar with a particular journal, then consider speaking with your local academic librarian as well as consulting resources from the publishing community (e.g. Think Check Submit) and the federal government (e.g. Federal Trade Commission).

In addition, there are other ways you can enhance the credibility of your research and publications, including: using rigorous practices, such as authenticating cell lines; clearly documenting methodology so others can replicate your work; sharing data; preregistering protocols; and issuing preprints to collect community feedback prior to publication.

All in all, to help convey the credibility of your work, be careful where you publish. We hope that our community publishes only in journals that do what they say they will do. If the rigor of your work is clearly conveyed in writing, and published in journals that maintain high quality standards, then your work will be viewed with respect. By taking these approaches, we can continue ensuring the credibility and trustworthiness of the biomedical and behavioral research findings resulting from public support.

Categories: NIH-Funding

Notice of Change in Eligibility for PAR-17-001 "Emerging Global Leader Award (K43)"

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 03:22
Notice NOT-TW-18-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Categories: NIH-Funding

Notice of Change in Application Due dates for PAR-17-001 "Emerging Global Leader Award (K43)"

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 03:15
Notice NOT-TW-18-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Categories: NIH-Funding

Human Subjects Mechanistic and Minimal Risk Studies (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 03:03
Funding Opportunity PA-18-351 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to encourage applications that seek to conduct studies of the visual system. This FOA will support applications that either Those that involve human subjects, but are not NIH-defined clinical trials (see NOT-OD-15-015); or Those that are NIH-defined clinical trials and are designed to address either: 1) mechanisms underlying human vision in health and disease; or 2) interventions that entail procedures with minimal risk to subjects. A mechanistic trial is defined as "A study designed to understand a biological or behavioral process, the pathophysiology of a disease, or the mechanism of action of an intervention. "Minimal risk" means that the probability and magnitude of harm or discomfort anticipated in the research are not greater in and of themselves than those ordinarily encountered in daily life or during the performance of routine physical or psychological examinations or tests. NIH-defined clinical trial applications that are neither mechanistic nor minimal risk are not eligible for this FOA. Large-scale clinical trials, human gene-transfer and stem cell therapy trials, and other complex or high resource- or safety-risk clinical trials are not appropriate for this FOA. Applicants are strongly advised to consult with NEI program staff prior to submitting an application with human subjects to determine the appropriate funding opportunity.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Translational Neural Devices (UG3/UH3 - Clinical Trial Required)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 02:45
Funding Opportunity RFA-NS-18-011 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage applications to pursue translational activities and small clinical studies to advance the development of therapeutic, and diagnostic devices for disorders that affect the nervous or neuromuscular systems. The translational device activities, including translational bench and animal studies, are expected to lead to submission of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or Institutional Review Board (IRB) application for a Non-Significant Risk (NSR) study. This cooperative agreement will also support the subsequent small clinical study to collect safety and effectiveness data required to support a marketing application or to inform final device design.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Translational Neural Devices (U44 - Clinical Trial Required)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 02:45
Funding Opportunity RFA-NS-18-012 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage applications from Small Business Concerns (SBCs) to pursue translational activities and small clinical studies to advance the development of therapeutic and diagnostic devices for disorders that affect the nervous or neuromuscular systems. The translational device activities, including translational bench and animal studies, are expected to lead to submission of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or Institutional Review Board (IRB) application for a Non-Significant Risk (NSR) study. This cooperative agreement will also support the subsequent small clinical study to collect safety and effectiveness data required to support a marketing application or to inform final device design.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Changes in NIGMS Support of Institutional Predoctoral T32 Training Grants in the Basic Biomedical Sciences

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 02:26
Notice NOT-GM-18-005 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Categories: NIH-Funding

BRAIN Initiative Fellows: Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Postdoctoral Fellowship (F32)

NIH Funding Announcements - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 13:09
Funding Opportunity RFA-MH-18-510 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of the BRAIN Initiative Fellows (F32) program is to enhance the research training of promising postdoctorates, early in their postdoctoral training period, who have the potential to become productive investigators in research areas that will advance the goals of the BRAIN Initiative. Applications are encouraged in any research area that is aligned with the BRAIN Initiative, including neuroethics. Applicants are expected to propose research training in an area that clearly complements their predoctoral research. Formal training in analytical tools appropriate for the proposed research is expected to be an integral component of the research training plan. In order to maximize the training potential of the F32 award, this program encourages applications from individuals who have not yet completed their terminal doctoral degree and who expect to do so within 12 months of the application due date. On the application due date, candidates may not have completed more than 12 months of postdoctoral training.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Altered neuronal circuits, receptors and networks in HIV-induced Central Nervous System (CNS) dysfunction (R01)-Clinical Trial Not Allowed

NIH Funding Announcements - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 12:44
Funding Opportunity RFA-MH-18-610 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites research grant applications to decipher pathways and mechanisms responsible for HIV-1 induced central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction seen in virally suppressed HIV-1 positive patients, by understanding the causal role played by altered neuronal circuits, neuronal receptors and neuronal networks. Basic and translational research in domestic and international settings are of interest. Multidisciplinary research teams and collaborative alliances are encouraged but not required.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Altered neuronal circuits, receptors and networks in HIV-induced Central Nervous System (CNS) dysfunction (R21- Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

NIH Funding Announcements - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 12:44
Funding Opportunity RFA-MH-18-611 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites research grant applications to decipher pathways and mechanisms responsible for HIV-1 induced central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction seen in virally suppressed HIV-1 positive patients, by understanding the causal role played by altered neuronal circuits, neuronal receptors and neuronal networks. Basic and translational research in domestic and international settings are of interest. Multidisciplinary research teams and collaborative alliances are encouraged but not required.
Categories: NIH-Funding

NIMH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant (R21 - Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

NIH Funding Announcements - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 12:09
Funding Opportunity PA-18-350 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The NIMH Exploratory/Developmental Grant program supports exploratory and high-risk research projects that fall within the NIMH mission by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methods, measures, models, or strategies, or to the generation of pilot or feasibility data. The preliminary work from these studies could lead to a major impact on biomedical, behavioral, or clinical mental health research, or on the delivery of mental health care.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Short-term Mentored Career Enhancement Awards for Mid-Career Investigators to Integrate Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences (K18 - No Independent Clinical Trials)

NIH Funding Announcements - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 11:46
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-349 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages applications for short-term mentored career development (K18) awards that improve synergies among researchers in basic and applied behavioral-social sciences, human subjects and model animals settings; and biomedical and behavioral-social sciences.
Categories: NIH-Funding

By: SaG

WriteEdit-Grant Questions Blog - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 11:28

Not true. From the F32 Parent announcement…

Individuals may receive up to 5 years of aggregate Kirschstein-NRSA support at the predoctoral level (up to 6 years for dual degree training, e.g., MD/PhD), and up to 3 years of aggregate Kirschstein-NRSA support at the postdoctoral level, including any combination of support from institutional training grants (e.g., T32) and an individual fellowship award.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-307.html#_Section_II._Award

Categories: NIH-Funding

Bioengineering Research Partnerships (U01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 10:48
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-208 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages bioengineering applications that will accelerate the development and adoption of promising tools and technologies that can address important biomedical problems.The objectives are to establish these tools and technologies as robust, well-characterized solutions that fulfill an unmet need and are capable of enhancing our understanding of life science processes or the practice of medicine.Awards will focus on supporting multidisciplinary teams that apply an integrative, quantitative bioengineering approach to developing technologies, and engage biomedical researchers or clinicians throughout the project.The goal of the program is to support projects that can realize meaningful solutions within 5 10 years.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Palliative Care Needs of Individuals with Rare Advanced Diseases and Their Family Caregivers (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 10:46
Funding Opportunity PA-18-167 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) seeks to expand knowledge and increase the evidence base for palliative care (PC) in advanced rare diseases, including rare cancers, and to improve physical and psychosocial well-being and quality of life among seriously ill individuals and their family caregivers.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Improving Individual and Family Outcomes through Continuity and Coordination of Care in Hospice (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 10:43
Funding Opportunity PA-18-166 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) seeks to stimulate research that focuses on reducing negative individual and family outcomes related to unwanted transitions at the end of life and optimizing the individual and family outcomes related to high quality coordination of care of care of individuals who are enrolled in hospice. This FOA emphasizes individuals who are receiving hospice care and their family caregivers, in any setting where hospice care is provided, including their home, a relatives home, a hospice inpatient facility, an assisted living facility, a short- or long-term care facility, or a hospital.
Categories: NIH-Funding