NIH-Funding

By: Abraham

WriteEdit-Grant Questions Blog - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:39

Dear write edit,

I have a question of R01 proposal. I want to observe a phenomenon in clinical study. And I hope to explain the phenomenon using an animal study. Can I put a clinical study and an animal study (on different specific aims) in a single R01 grant proposal?

Thank you!

Abraham

Categories: NIH-Funding

Reducing Health Disparities Among Minority and Underserved Children (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:35
Funding Opportunity PA-18-169 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This initiative encourages research that targets the reduction of health disparities among children. Investing in early childhood development is essential. Specific targeted areas of research include bio-behavioral studies that incorporate multiple factors that influence child health disparities such as biological (e.g., genetics, cellular, organ systems), lifestyle factors, environmental (e.g., physical and family environments) social (e.g., peers), economic, institutional, and cultural and family influences; studies that target the specific health promotion needs of children with a known health condition and/or disability; and studies that test, evaluate, translate, and disseminate health promotion prevention and interventions conducted in traditional and non -traditional settings
Categories: NIH-Funding

Chronic Condition Self-Management in Children and Adolescents (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:33
Funding Opportunity PA-18-168 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage exploratory/developmental research to improve self-management and quality of life in children and adolescents with chronic conditions. Managing a chronic condition is an unremitting responsibility for children and their families. Children with a chronic condition and their families have a long-term responsibility for self-management. This FOA encourages research that takes into consideration various factors that influence self-management such as individual differences, biological and psychological factors, family/caregivers and sociocultural context, family-community dynamics, healthcare system factors, technological advances, and the role of the environment.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Reducing Health Disparities Among Minority and Underserved Children (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:31
Funding Opportunity PA-18-152 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This initiative encourages research that targets the reduction of health disparities among children. Investing in early childhood development is essential. Specific targeted areas of research include bio-behavioral studies that incorporate multiple factors that influence child health disparities such as biological (e.g., genetics, cellular, organ systems), lifestyle factors, environmental (e.g., physical and family environments) social (e.g., peers), economic, institutional, and cultural and family influences; studies that target the specific health promotion needs of children with a known health condition and/or disability; and studies that test, evaluate, translate, and disseminate health promotion prevention and interventions conducted in traditional and non -traditional settings.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Chronic Condition Self-Management in Children and Adolescents (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:29
Funding Opportunity PA-18-151 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage research to improve self-management and quality of life in children and adolescents with chronic conditions. Managing a chronic condition is an unremitting responsibility for children and their families. Children with a chronic condition and their families have a long-term responsibility for self-management. This FOA encourages research that takes into consideration various factors that influence self-management such as individual differences, biological and psychological factors, family/caregivers and sociocultural context, family-community dynamics, healthcare system factors, technological advances, and the role of the environment.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Promoting Caregiver Health Using Self-Management (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:27
Funding Opportunity PA-18-150 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this initiative is to stimulate research in promoting caregiver health using self-management. Caregiving is an important science area since the number of people living longer with chronic conditions is growing. Informal caregivers (lay caregivers) are defined as unpaid individuals (spouses, partners, family members, friends, or neighbors) involved in assisting others with activities of daily living and/or medical tasks. Formal caregivers are paid, delivering care in ones home or care settings (daycare, residential care facility). This concept focuses on informal caregivers.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Selected Topics in Transfusion Medicine (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:26
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-132 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research grant applications from investigators who propose to study research topics in blood banking and transfusion medicine aimed at improving the safety and availability of the blood supply and the practice of transfusion medicine. Research focused on improving blood donor health, the safety and availability of blood products, and improving the practice of transfusion medicine is critical to public health. Research designed to better understand the determinants of transfusion-associated adverse events and how best to minimize transfusion risks is also important. Research is also needed to maintain an adequate blood supply by minimizing the risks associated with the donation process and developing enhanced recruitment and retention programs.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Selected Topics in Transfusion Medicine (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:23
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-126 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research grant applications from investigators who propose to study research topics in blood banking and transfusion medicine aimed at improving the safety and availability of the blood supply and the practice of transfusion medicine. Research focused on improving blood donor health, the safety and availability of blood products, and improving the practice of transfusion medicine is critical to public health. Research designed to better understand the determinants of transfusion-associated adverse events and how best to minimize transfusion risks is also important. Research is also needed to maintain an adequate blood supply by minimizing the risks associated with the donation process and developing enhanced recruitment and retention programs.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Transition to Independent Environmental Health Research (TIEHR) Career Transition Award (K01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:21
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-291 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Transitions to Independent Environmental Health (TIEHR) Career Award is a 3-year bridge scholar development program for newly independent faculty who intend to pursue research careers in environmental health sciences. At the conclusion of the career development period the candidates are expected to demonstrate they can successfully compete for research funding in the environmental health sciences.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Alzheimer's Drug-Development Program (U01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:17
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-174 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The goal of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to provide funding support for the pre-clinical and early stage clinical (Phase I) development ofsmall-molecule and biologic therapeutic agents that prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD), slow its progression or treat its cognitive and behavioral symptoms.Participants in this program will receive funding for therapy development activities such as medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics (PK), Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, Toxicology (ADMET), efficacy in animal models, formulation development, chemical synthesis under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), Investigational New Drug (IND) enabling studies and initial Phase I clinical testing. This program does not support research on basic mechanisms of disease, development of biomarkers, devices, non-pharmacological interventions (e.g., exercise, diet, cognitive training), repurposed drugs and combinations therapies or, discovery activities such as high throughput screening and hit optimization.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Transition to Independent Environmental Health Research (TIEHR) Career Transition Award (K01 Clinical Trial Required)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:11
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-261 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Transitions to Independent Environmental Health (TIEHR) Career Award is a 3-year bridge scholar development program for newly independent faculty who intend to pursue research careers in environmental health sciences. At the conclusion of the career development period the candidates are expected to demonstrate they can successfully compete for research funding in the environmental health sciences.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Mechanism for Time-Sensitive Drug Abuse Research (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 11:04
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-064 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) will support pilot, feasibility or exploratory research in 5 priority areas in substance use epidemiology and health services, including: 1) responses to sudden and severe emerging drug issues (e.g. the ability to look into a large and sudden spike in synthetic cannabinoid use/overdoses in a particular community); 2) responses to emerging marijuana trends and topics related to the shifting policy landscape; 3) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive prescription drug abuse research opportunities (e.g.,new state or local efforts); 4) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive medical system issues (e.g. opportunities to understand addiction services in the evolving health care system); and 5) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive criminal or juvenile justice opportunities (e.g. new system and/or structural level changes) that relate to drug abuse and access and provision of health care service. It should be clear that the knowledge gained from the proposed study is time-sensitive and that an expedited rapid review and funding are required in order for the scientific question to be answered.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Metabolic Contributions to the Neurocognitive Complications of Diabetes: Ancillary Studies (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 09:41
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-051 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications for human studies to elucidate the etiology and pathogenesis of the increased risk for neurocognitive impairment associated with type 2 diabetes.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Linking the Provider Recommendation to Adolescent HPV Vaccine Uptake (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 09:39
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-019 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research on how the healthcare delivery system enhances or inhibits the effectiveness of a provider's recommendation of the adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Characteristics of the provider, parent/patient, and clinical setting, can all affect whether a provider makes a recommendation, and whether that recommendation results in uptake of the HPV vaccine. This research requires expertise in cancer prevention, adult and childhood behavior, immunization promotion, and healthcare delivery
Categories: NIH-Funding

Linking the Provider Recommendation to Adolescent HPV Vaccine Uptake (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 09:36
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-008 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research on how the healthcare delivery system enhances or inhibits the effectiveness of a provider's recommendation of the adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Characteristics of the provider, parent/patient, and clinical setting, can all affect whether a provider makes a recommendation, and whether that recommendation results in uptake of the HPV vaccine. This research requires expertise in cancer prevention, adult and childhood behavior, immunization promotion, and healthcare delivery.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Continuing Steps to Ensuring Credibility of NIH Research: Selecting Journals with Credible Practices

Rock Talk: NIH Extramural News - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 08:54

The scientific community is paying increasing attention to the quality practices of journals and publishers. NIH recently released a Guide notice (NOT-OD-18-011) to encourage authors to publish in journals that do not undermine the credibility, impact, and accuracy of their research findings. This notice aims to raise awareness about practices like changing publication fees without notice, lacking transparency in publication procedures, misrepresenting editorial boards, and/or using suspicious peer review.

This may not be a big problem for NIH-funded publications now; our colleagues Jennifer Marill, Kathryn Funk, and Jerry Sheehan from the National Library of Medicine note that more than 90% of the 815,000 publicly available journal articles reporting on NIH-funded research are published in MEDLINE indexed journals. Nonetheless, we do know that a problem exists – there are articles reporting NIH-funded research appearing in journals that engage in questionable practices. Ensuring the credibility of NIH funded research is important to maintaining public trust in research.

NIH has taken—and continues to take—many steps to ensure the credibility of the research it supports. From enhancing rigor and reproducibility, to encouraging sharing of data and protocols, to promoting pre-prints, and to requiring timely registration and reporting of clinical trial results, NIH establishes policies to make our funded research as credible, transparent, rigorous, and full of impact as possible.

But what can we do?

Simply put, publish where you cite. If you are not familiar with a particular journal, then consider speaking with your local academic librarian as well as consulting resources from the publishing community (e.g. Think Check Submit) and the federal government (e.g. Federal Trade Commission).

In addition, there are other ways you can enhance the credibility of your research and publications, including: using rigorous practices, such as authenticating cell lines; clearly documenting methodology so others can replicate your work; sharing data; preregistering protocols; and issuing preprints to collect community feedback prior to publication.

All in all, to help convey the credibility of your work, be careful where you publish. We hope that our community publishes only in journals that do what they say they will do. If the rigor of your work is clearly conveyed in writing, and published in journals that maintain high quality standards, then your work will be viewed with respect. By taking these approaches, we can continue ensuring the credibility and trustworthiness of the biomedical and behavioral research findings resulting from public support.

Categories: NIH-Funding

Notice of Change in Eligibility for PAR-17-001 "Emerging Global Leader Award (K43)"

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 03:22
Notice NOT-TW-18-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Categories: NIH-Funding

Notice of Change in Application Due dates for PAR-17-001 "Emerging Global Leader Award (K43)"

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 03:15
Notice NOT-TW-18-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Categories: NIH-Funding

Human Subjects Mechanistic and Minimal Risk Studies (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 03:03
Funding Opportunity PA-18-351 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to encourage applications that seek to conduct studies of the visual system. This FOA will support applications that either Those that involve human subjects, but are not NIH-defined clinical trials (see NOT-OD-15-015); or Those that are NIH-defined clinical trials and are designed to address either: 1) mechanisms underlying human vision in health and disease; or 2) interventions that entail procedures with minimal risk to subjects. A mechanistic trial is defined as "A study designed to understand a biological or behavioral process, the pathophysiology of a disease, or the mechanism of action of an intervention. "Minimal risk" means that the probability and magnitude of harm or discomfort anticipated in the research are not greater in and of themselves than those ordinarily encountered in daily life or during the performance of routine physical or psychological examinations or tests. NIH-defined clinical trial applications that are neither mechanistic nor minimal risk are not eligible for this FOA. Large-scale clinical trials, human gene-transfer and stem cell therapy trials, and other complex or high resource- or safety-risk clinical trials are not appropriate for this FOA. Applicants are strongly advised to consult with NEI program staff prior to submitting an application with human subjects to determine the appropriate funding opportunity.
Categories: NIH-Funding

Translational Neural Devices (UG3/UH3 - Clinical Trial Required)

NIH Funding Announcements - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 02:45
Funding Opportunity RFA-NS-18-011 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage applications to pursue translational activities and small clinical studies to advance the development of therapeutic, and diagnostic devices for disorders that affect the nervous or neuromuscular systems. The translational device activities, including translational bench and animal studies, are expected to lead to submission of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or Institutional Review Board (IRB) application for a Non-Significant Risk (NSR) study. This cooperative agreement will also support the subsequent small clinical study to collect safety and effectiveness data required to support a marketing application or to inform final device design.
Categories: NIH-Funding